LES FIDELINES

        A collection of romantic bows, ruffles and brooches to wear around the neck, inspired by Fideline’s era (mid 19th century, the Victorian era). The pieces are hand-embellished with pleated trims, delicate beading and dazzling crystals to delight all poetry lovers.

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                              

                                                                                                            Fideline's embroidery, 1849                                             

              

   

      During my last visit to France, after a year spent away from my family, I felt the urge to go through my family’s attic. I was on a hunt for Proustian Madeleines and the comfort that precious family heirlooms provide. I found an old cross-stitch embroidery. Under the main patterns was embroidered ‘offert a mes chers parents, l’an 1849, Fideline Leclercq’ ‘offered to my dear parents, in 1849, Fideline Leclercq”. I haven’t found who Fideline was exactly, a family member or friend, but I know that she used to, over a century ago, hold this delicate cloth that I had in my hand, thread a needle and loose herself into her special zone, giving her whole attention to this beautiful piece. It was like a little bit of Fideline was here with me. 

     It is always moving to find a piece which survived through decades. An object or a garment made with passion and pride. With this collection, I wanted to celebrate the Fidelines, the craft(wo)men who chose the slow process that is manual artistry to strive for beauty, quality and perfection. The collection is featured by six craft(wo)men that I met while working in London: Claire, Victoria, Andrew, Karen, Jack and Axelle. Embroiderers, fashion and puppet makers, with their hands, like Fideline, they give life to refined pieces. In today’s digital world, we often wonder if working with our hands is still relevant? Is it necessary to spend years training to master a craft? Craft(wo)men care about their work like a machine doesn’t and this attention to detail gives a timeless and durable value to what they make. A quality which is crucial today, as we aspire for sustainability. 

 

     Handcrafting is creating a piece which can transcend time, a piece for the future.

     With Love,

     Justine

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